PARENTtalk Archives

PARENTtalk: Practical Information, Hopeful Perspectives

From 1998 to 2007, Stop It Now! published PARENTtalk, a publication by and for parents and caregivers of youth with sexual behavior problems.  It was discontinued due to lack of funding. 

PARENTtalk archives offer practical information and hopeful perspectives for any adult looking for support in responding to sexually concerning behaviors in children or youth.  To break the isolation that caregivers so often face, PARENTtalk published personal stories from families who have generously shared their experiences as well as updates from some of the leading professionals in the field.  

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PARENTtalk Archives

PARENTtalk by Stop It Now! is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Creative Commons LicenseNonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. Please contact us for permission beyond the scope of this license.

A Community-Based Approach to Healing Families   (Fall 2007)

  • Finding a respectful partnership between parents and professionals.
  • Learn about an alternative to institutionalized care for youth.
  • Resources for specialized treatment.
  • Guest column by Steve Gilbertson, MS

Loving Them Both (Spring 2005)

  • How to cope when both the abuser and the victim are your children.
  • Promoting healthy sexuality in young people with sexual behavior problems.
  • Guest column by Steve Brown, PsyD

Support Groups for Parents *(Fall 2004)

  • Four stories from parents in a caregiver support group.
  • Why parents need support in order to help their children.
  • Guest column by Dan Knoepfler, MC

When Abuse Hits Home (Spring 2004)

  • What to expect in the aftermath of abuse-- understanding what a family will face.
  • What to consider when looking for treatment for your child.
  • Guest column by Steven Bengis, Ed D, LCSW

Stronger and Wiser  (Spring 2002)

  • Facing recovery and breaking the isolation, families seek help, come together and heal.
  • Parents of children with sexual behavior problems share with Stop It Now!.
  • Guest column by: David Prescott, MSW

Parent to Parent: How You Can Help  (Winter 2001)

  • Books that help: Healing books for children, youth and their parents.
  • How you can find the books you’ll need.
  • Guest column by Euan Bear

They've Moved Forward, Forever Changed (Summer 2000)

  • The light at the end of the tunnel–family follow-up from Summer 1998 issue.
  • What to do to support safer behavior in children with sexual behavior problems.
  • Guest column by Patti Cutler, M Ed, LMHC

Parents Breaking the Isolation: An Evening Just for Parents  (Spring 2000)

  • A parent focus group at the New England Conference on Child Sexual Abuse.
  • How to prevent re-offending – safety, supervision and communication.
  • Guest column by David Prescott, LICSW

Loving Them for Telling the Truth: Healing the Victim and the Younger Offender (Winter 2000)

  • Healing the victim and the young offender.
  • Responding to concerning sexual behavior in young children.
  • Guest column by Toni Cavanagh Johnson, PhD

A Family Sustained and Nourished with Openness   (Spring 1999)

  • Turning lives around: With help families can heal from multiple traumas.
  • Managing the accusation and the grief of discovery.
  • Also includes: “Supervision of Your Child”.
  • Guest column by William Ballantyne, PsyD

Love & Communication Guide Family to Recovery  (Winter 1999)

  • One parent’s story about the path to healing.
  • Sharing the secret and how to talk about this.

A Family's Road to Healing (Fall 1998)

  • The importance of trusting your instincts about your children.
  • Dos & don’ts of loving your child with sexual behavior problems.
  • Guest column by Tiff Waskowicz

A Message of Hope and Courage (Summer 1998)

  • Treatment is out there and it works; survivors and abusers are not “damaged for life”.
  • What other behaviors to watch for.
  • Guest column by Rob Freeman-Longo, MRC, LPC

The Most Difficult Decision of My Life  (Spring 1998)

  • Deciding to report sexual offenses committed by your child.
  • What is age appropriate sexual behavior?